Building or Renovating in Queen's Park

PROPERTY CATEGORIES IN THE Queen's Park HERITAGE CONsERVATION AREA

Properties in the Queen’s Park Heritage Conservation Area (HCA) are categorized as either protected or non-protected. Some properties are under a temporary study category (Special Limited), but will eventually move to either the protected or non-protected category once the City has completed an additional assessment (learn more on the Ongoing Work page).

You can check the status of your property using the maps and table provided below. Please note, these are provided for convenience only. Contact the Planning Division to confirm the status of your property. 

HERITAGE ALTERATION PERMITS (HAP) + DESIGN GUIDELINES

The Heritage Conservation Area places design control on houses in Queen's Park.  

If you wish to renovate or demolish your house, build a new house, or build a laneway or carriage house, you may be required to apply to the City for a Heritage Alternation Permit (HAP) to show that the proposed work is in keeping with the design guidelines. The work that requires a Heritage Alteration Permit is summarized in the table below. You can learn more about when a Heritage Alteration Permit is required in the Queen’s Park Heritage Conservation Area Guide, or by contacting the Planning Division.

Applications will be reviewed for their compatibility with either the acceptable or recommended design guidelines. Final approval of the application will be considered by the director of Development Services. 

If required, you must also apply for a Building Permit once the Heritage Alteration Permit has been approved. Visit the City’s Building Webpage for more information.
 

Category Renovation New Construction Demolition
Protected Properties A HAP is required for renovations to the front or sides of a home, or to the roof visible from the street.

The design guidelines in Section B are relevant for these applications.

No HAP is required for changes such as interior alterations, changes to paint colour, routine maintenance, or exterior alterations to the rear of the building. 
A HAP is required for the construction of a laneway or carriage house.

The design guidelines in Sections A are relevant for these applications.
A HAP is required to allow the demolition of a home.
Non-Protected  Properties No HAP is required for alterations to the existing building.

A HAP is required for the construction of a new house.

The design guidelines in Section A and Section C are relevant for these applications. 

No HAP is required to demolish a home. 
Special Limited Study Properties  No HAP is required for alterations to the existing building. A HAP is required for the construction of a new house.

The design guidelines in Section A and Section C are relevant for these applications.
A HAP is required to allow the demolition of a home.

 

Additional Resources 

  • Does the HCA change how big my house can be?

    Yes! If your property is protected under the Heritage Conservation Area you are allowed additional floor space, beyond what was previously available.The floor space of your house can now be up to a maximum of 70% of your property size. For example, if your property is 6,000 square feet, your house can be up to 4,200 square feet. (This is called a 0.7 Floor Space Ratio).If your house is already at the maximum, you can still renovate, but need to stay within the floor space limit in the Zoning Bylaw. 

    The effect of the Heritage Conservation Area for protected properties is that design guidelines now apply for additions or other changes, if the work proposed would make changes to the house that are visible from the street (front, sides or roof). No additional permits are required and no design guidelines apply if the renovation is at the back of the house and/or the interior.

    For non-protected properties, you can continue to do renovations to build a bigger house, if it is not yet at the maximum. The floor space of your house can be up to a maximum of 50% of your property size. For example, if your property is 6,000 square feet, your house can be up to 3,000 square feet. (This is called a 0.5 Floor Space Ratio). The other regulations in the Zoning Bylaw, such as setbacks and height, also still apply.

    When is a Heritage Alternation Permit Required?

    The need to apply for a Heritage Alteration Permit (HAP) depends on the category of your property and the type of work you intend to do.

    For protected properties, a HAP is required for any changes to the outside of the house that
    are visible from the street (front, sides, or roof). A HAP is also required for the construction of
    laneway and carriage houses. Demolitions of protected houses will only be permitted
    under specific circumstances. 

    For non-protected properties, a HAP is not required for renovations and demolitions. However, a HAP is required for the construction of new houses, and laneway and carriage
    houses.

    You can learn more about when a Heritage Alteration Permit is required in the Queen’s Park Heritage Conservation Area Guide, or by contacting the Planning Division.

    What if I believe my property is in the wrong category?

    Protecting your house strengthens the Heritage Conservation Area and may provide incentives to the property.

    If you have a protected property and believe your property should be moved to the non-protected category, there are two options for you to consider.

    1. Request to be included in the study being completed by the City. The City will conduct an evaluation using the Evaluation Checklist. If a house received a score of 60% or less, it would be considered reasonable to remove the protection. The City would be the applicant for the potential resulting OCP amendment and associated costs would be borne by the City. See the Expanded Special Limited Category Study for more information.
       
    2. At any time you can hire a heritage professional to assess the heritage value of your house and make a formal application to the City. The same Evaluation Checklist will be used to assess applications. Contact the Planning Division about making an application. Final approval is considered by Council after a public hearing has been held. 
       

    If you you have a non-protected property and believe your property has heritage value you can consider applying to have your property protected. It would also become part of the protected category and would be eligible for any incentives adopted. There is no fee associated with the application.

    Can I demolish my protected home?

    Demolition of a protected home in Queen’s Park is only permitted under specific circumstances.

    The Heritage Alteration Permit application to demolish a home will be reviewed against the Evaluation Checklist, which is organized into three categories:

    1. Heritage Character and Merit
    Intent: Retain neighbourhood buildings with heritage merit in order to retain the historic character of the neighbourhood.

    2. Development Potential
    Intent: Retain a property owner’s right to make additions up to the size of building permitted under the existing Zoning Bylaw.

    3. Condition
    Intent: Consider the condition of the house, the integrity of its historic elements, and the work required to achieve heritage retention.

    Each criteria on the checklist will be scored. If a house receives an overall score of 60% or less, demolition will be considered reasonable. It is then likely that the HAP application for demolition will be approved. If the house receives a score of more than 60%, retention will be considered reasonable and the HAP application for demolition will likely not be approved.

    Does the Heritage Conservation Area provide me with any benefits as a property owner?

    The City recognizes that protecting properties is valuable to the community at large and contributes to New Westminster’s character. The City is currently implementing incentives for protected category properties, including additional floor space allowances, to recognize this contribution. Learn more about the Incentive Program on the Ongoing Work page.

    Incentives do not apply to non-protected category properties. However, homes in this category that have heritage value can apply to their property to the protected category. If successful this would mean that the owner would be entitled to any benefit offered to protected category properties. 

    Are there other opportunities to protect my property and make improvements?

    Heritage Revitalization Agreements (HRAs) provide a higher level of protection (through Heritage Designation) than what is provided in the Heritage Conservation Area. HRAs may be applied to protected properties in exchange for additional incentives. Non-protected properties with heritage value may also be eligible for incentives through an HRA. More information about the difference between the Heritage Conservation Area and HRAs is available in the Heritage Protection Levels Guide.

    I’d like to build a laneway or carriage house in Queen’s Park, what is the process?

    The City now permits the development of laneway and carriage houses on many single detached dwelling properties, including those in Queen’s Park. You will be required to meet all zoning regulations and the intent of the design guidelines for both the Heritage Conservation Area and the Laneway and Carriage House Development Permit Area. For more information, visit the Laneway and Carriage House webpage.
     

  • Planning Division

    For information about the Heritage Conservation Area, the zoning of your property, and regulations for secondary suites or laneway and carriage houses.

    Phone: 604-527-4532
    Email:

    Building Division

    For information on Building Code and Plumbing Bylaw requirements, and the Building Permit process.

    Phone: 604-527-4580
    Email:
    Webpage: Building and Property Improvements