Feature Exhibitions


RECONCILING

Gallery 7 (Anvil Centre)

February 16 – December 2022

Through three installations, Reconciling addresses truths attached to acts of reconciliation. Haida/Nisga’a artist Luke Parnell explores a feeling of disenchantment through his piece Neon Reconciliation Explosion; the downed statue of Judge Begbie addresses the imposition of foreign laws on a land; and the 215 shoes placed at New Westminster’s cenotaph reflects our community’s response to the Residential School legacy in Canada.

Programs with this exhibition

Neon Reconciliation Explosion Field Trip

We have worked with Luke to create an interactive activity for students. Students will receive an inquiry-based tour of the exhibition and can then reflect, create, and connect with what reconciliation means to them.

Click here to see the full flyer

Fee: Free
Each visit is 75 minutes.
We welcome up to 30 students max.

Booking contact:
Rebeca Salas, Heritage Programs Coordinator; rsalas@newwestcity.ca

Artist Talk: Neon Reconciliation Explosion with Luke Parnell (All Ages)

Luke Parnell is Laxgiik (Eagle) from Wilps Kwa’kaans on his mother side and Haida from Massett on his Fathers side, his Nisga’a name is Guxw Gahlgan (always carving). 

Join Luke as he speaks to his work, Neon Reconciliation Explosion. Parnell created this project with over 55 community members, the goal of the project was to gain a greater understanding of what reconciliation was.

This talk kicks off our feature exhibition, Reconciling. 

Attend in person or virtually via Zoom.

Gallery 7 (Museum at Anvil Centre) & Streamed via Zoom    604.527.4640
Thursday, Feb 17
7:00 - 8:30pm
Course ID 131736
Free


CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY IN CANADA THROUGH TESSELLATION AND PORTRAITURE

Gallery 2 (Anvil Centre)

February 2 – June 19 2022

Moved by a push for greater social justice, NWSS Art students researched prominent figures from Black History in Canada and share their contributions in black and white tessellation patterns and portraits. Equal parts ‘black’ and ‘white’ in these works challenges a Eurocentric-lens that is too often applied when discussing history by featuring People of Colour (POC) and Black Canadians in an equally starring role. Each student provides a thoughtful artist statement with their portrait.

This exhibition replicates the original class work, design, and display.

View the portraits and artist statements here